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A Monster in Paris

24 Sep

It may ring a bell… or not, the name Bibo Bergeron is already well-known in the animation world for Shark Tale and The Road to El Dorado. Now there’s a new magical title: “A Monster in Paris”, featuring Bergeron’s trademark animation style and rhythmic, well-written musical numbers, thanks to Matthieu Chedid (also known as M) and the lovely voice of Vanessa Paradis.

The story of “A Monster in Paris” sets in Paris in 1910, Emile, a shy movie projectionist, and Raoul, a colorful inventor, find themselves embarked on the hunt for a monster terrorizing citizens. They join forces with Lucille, the big-hearted star of the Bird of Paradise cabaret, an eccentric scientist and his irascible monkey to save the monster, who turns out to be an oversized but harmless flea, from the city’s ruthlessly ambitious police chief.

“A Monster in Paris” is set to be released on the 12th of october.

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Discovering new music

22 Sep

What better way to re-start than with a great song? And since I love music… the first article will be about, of course, music! First I would like to mention Thesixtyone, a great site to discover new music. Your can truly spend hours here  just listening to good, fresh new tunes. One of the artists I discovered recently (thanks to Thesixtyone) was William Fitzsimmons. Fitsimmons’ songs quickly find their way into your heart and if not through your head, then through the deep emotional characteristics of each and every song.

But since I don’t want to leave you with a melancholic mood (since Fitzsimmon’s songs can be quite gut-wrenching sometimes), we’ll end this on a happier note, namely the music of singer-songwriter Clara C (Clara Chung). Not really known yet in Belgium, but one day… maybe. In the meantime enjoy!

Molly Johnson

20 Feb

Heard her for the first time in San Francisco, and I immediatly fell in love with her style.

http://www.mollyjohnson.com/

Albums:

  • Molly Johnson (2000)
  • Another day (2003)
  • Messin’ around (2006)
  • If you know love (2007, French release of “Messin’ around”)
  • Lucky (2008)

Lonely Drifter Karen

23 Jan

“Lonely Drifter Karen” is a musical project founded by the Austrian singer Tanja Frinta in 2003. The music combines folk, dark cabaret and pop with the influence of ’40s and ’50s musicals.

Album:

  • “Grass is Singing”, 2008

Info:

Moodio.tv

14 Jan

Belgium has a great new musicplatform: a unique combination of web TV and innovative promotional tools:

http://www.moodio.tv

“Artists – both famous and obscure – as well as events, concert halls and societies will be in the spotlight thanks to original and varied editorial content, using high quality video reports.”

“Diversity is the source of our music scene’s wealth, and that’s why Moodio.TV is committed to covering all musical genres, from jazz to electro, hip-hop to classical and rock to world music and folk.”

“Moodio.TV is also on a national mission, aiming to unite the two language communities on a single platform. This means they will not only discover themselves and each other, but also all that they contribute separately and in unison to the national and international diffusion of our music culture.”

“Using this broad perspective of Belgian music, Moodio.TV will focus on both new discoveries as well as “sure bets”. And that means that emerging and established artists, big and small events, large gatherings and intimate auditoriums sit side by side on Moodio.TV.”

“Music industry performers and professionals will also be able to use our targeted and personalised video resources to promote and develop their own work alongside the existing web tools already available (dedicated sites, social networks, etc.).”

“Moodio.TV will also become an essential database. All of these valuable services will help to simplify professional interaction.”

“Moodio.TV is a passionate and ambitious initiative just waiting to be discovered at http://www.moodio.tv.”

(Source: http://www.moodio.tv)

The TV Show

11 Jan

… such a cool video!

“The TV Show” was animated by Kousuku Sugimoto and the music (which fits the video perfectly, but I don’t like it that much) is by Takayuki Manabe.

New ‘Baroque’ Organ

4 Jan

The Organ at Christ Church, Episcopal, Rochester, is a nearly exact copy of a late Baroque organ, built by Adam Gottlob Casparini of East Prussia in 1776. The original stands in the Holy Ghost Church in Vilnius, Lithuania. There is no other contemporary organ like this one.

“The metal pipes are made of lead and tin, hand-rolled around wooden templates and soldered. Most of the wooden pipes are made of pine. High-register pipes are small and narrow, some the size of a pencil. Low-register pipes approach the diameter of storm drains. The congregation sees perhaps 100 pipes from its vantage point in the pews. The rest — the Christ Church organ has more than 2,200 in all — are tucked out of sight behind the console.”

“The project to build a replica of the Vilnius organ began in 2000 at the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, but Eastman had long wanted a new instrument for Christ Church. David Higgs, a concert organist and head of the Eastman organ department, had been seeking one for years.”

“In 1998, Mr. Higgs met Dr. Davidsson, the founder of the Goteborg Organ Art Center in Sweden. The center specializes in reconstructing historic organs and in making sure that restored instruments sounded the way the builders intended and that they properly played the music that was written for them.”

“Reconstruction is not easy. The technique for building large Baroque pipe organs had matured by the 17th century, but progress since then has put new tools in builders’ hands. Entirely new schools of organ-building, performance, composition and taste evolved. These days, organs are tuned differently. Many are bigger, more robust and designed to play different kinds of music. Older organs needed to keep up with the times, so they were modified, sometimes so radically that their original tone could no longer be discerned.”

(Source: http://www.nytimes.com)